Install this theme

Posts tagged: jennifer egan

i would sell my soul to be able to go to this.

i would sell my soul to be able to go to this.

fuckyeahmanuscripts:

Jennifer Egan’s journal

fuckyeahmanuscripts:

Jennifer Egan’s journal

millionsmillions:

“So, The Millions, who’d you get to write for your Year In Reading series?”
“Oh, you know. Just Jennifer Egan.”

millionsmillions:

“So, The Millions, who’d you get to write for your Year In Reading series?”

“Oh, you know. Just Jennifer Egan.”

imremembering:

“The nature of nostalgia is that it seems to infuse life with a kind of added richness and charge because it’s being processed through memory. And often we sort of wish that present day life had that charge.” 

- Jennifer Egan on NPR’s On Point

Music wasn’t [the novel’s] independent goal; it just insistently surged in. When that is happening, it means that something is organically necessary. And the organically necessary things are always the ones that work the best.
Jennifer Egan
On April 18th, Jennifer Egan’s fourth novel, A Visit from the Goon Squad, was named the 2011 Pulitzer Prize winner for fiction. And music-minded bookworms celebrated! Because though much of the praise for Egan’s book may have been due to its structure (a string of diverse but interlocked short stories), post-modern narrative (one chapter is made up of a PowerPoint created by an autistic boy in the near-future — one that was, humorously, ill-formatted on a Kindle), and emotional depth, at its heart, the strength of Goon Squad is the celebration of music’s many powers: time-keeper, myth-maker, memory-organizer, cultural avenger. This, bookworms recognized, made it special — not just another piece of Rock Lit.
I find no coincidence in the fact that Jennifer Egan also loves “Faith” by George Michael.

I find no coincidence in the fact that Jennifer Egan also loves “Faith” by George Michael.

she’s so freaking cool.

This is the novel’s grace note, Egan’s assertion that the authentic can still spark and flare even when the entire apparatus surrounding it is calculated and artificial. Of course she thinks this, and why shouldn’t she be right? What else is an artist but someone who believes that she can barter a little piece of herself to the world and not only preserve its essential worth, but even multiply it, by sharing it with others? She has to hope that the machinery making it all possible won’t kill the thing itself. Because that machinery isn’t going away, even if it does assume new forms and new powers to go with those forms. It’s more than just the way we live now, it is the world we’ve made for ourselves, out of our selves. Like it or not, we’re stuck with us.
laura miller, in this great piece from the guardian